Super Natural History - The Loch Ness Edition

LochNessLabWorkPhotoProject Overview

Finally, science can solve one of the world’s biggest mysteries. Is the Loch Ness Monster real? 

The search of Loch Ness is about so much more than mysterious water monsters. It’s about cutting edge science which will make a real difference in how we monitor and protect the world’s increasingly fragile ecosystems.

DNA sequencing technology, first developed for the Human Genome Project, finds new uses to test the surrounding environment to find out what lives there. The Super Natural History Loch Ness project and others around the world are using the messy nature of living things to analyse them in a way that is accurate and does no harm. Whether it’s as small as a marine worm or as large as a blue whale, as old as a woolly mammoth or a species new to science, it can now be studied without even being seen.

This is thanks to environmental DNA (eDNA).

With Neil leading an impressive team of experts, the search is now on. Visit the Super Natural History website to find more about the project.

Media Highlights

NBC

National Geographic

The Spinoff

The Conversation

 

Collaborators

Neil Gemmell, University of Otago (Project leader)

Michael Knapp, University of Otago

Gert-Jan Jeunen, University of Otago

Dianne Gleeson, University of Canberra

Adrian Shine, The Loch Ness Project

Tom Gilbert, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen

Kristine Bohmann, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen

Pierre Taberlet, Laboratoire d’Ecologie Alpine Grenoble

Beth Shapiro, University of California Santa Cruz

Eric Verspoor, The Rivers and Lochs Institute at Inverness College UHI, part of the University of the Highlands and Islands

Lucio Marcello, The Rivers and Lochs Institute at Inverness College UHI, part of the University of the Highlands and Islands

Lori Lawson Handley, University of Hull

Bernd Hänfling, University of Hull

Cristina Di Muri, University of Hull